Yoga Quote

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Another beautiful quote by Yoga guru B.K.S. Iyengar.

These words have the power to resonate with every one of us, & apply to our journey through life’s ups & downs, in addition to the ups & downs faced on the yoga mat. Viewing fear & change in this way empowers us to have an open mind, & greet change with a positive outlook rather than shying away or giving in to worry or doubts. Becoming who we are “meant to be” takes challenges, experience, & perseverance.

This is the perfect quote for the constant changes here at NPTI with students graduating and incoming students starting every few months!

Define a Pose #8

Paschimottanasana

  • Pronunciation: Posh-ee-moh-tan-AHS-anna

  • Translation: Seated forward bend

  • Type of Pose: forward bend

  • Benefits:

    • Stretches back of entire body from heels to head (including spine, lower back & hamstrings)

    • Stretches shoulders

    • Stimulates organs including intestines, kidneys & liver

    • Therapeutic for high blood pressure, infertility, insomnia, & sinusitis

  • Looks Like:

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Yoga Breathing for Anxiety

We live in a time of stress, & some of us are so overwhelmed by it that we become anxious. At NPTI's Yoga Teacher Training program, learn to practice & teach simple & effective breathing techniques to establish calm.

We live in a time of stress, & some of us are so overwhelmed by it that we become anxious. At NPTI's Yoga Teacher Training program, learn to practice & teach simple & effective breathing techniques to establish calm.

This article briefly discusses what pranayama (breath control) is, & a couple of breathing techniques to practice & start relieving anxiety!

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/enlightened-living/200804/yogic-breathing-remedy-anxiety

Scholarly Article: Military-Tailored Yoga for Veterans with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

This recent study titled, “Military-Tailored Yoga for Veterans with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder” was published in February 2018, and was featured in the May-June 2018 edition of the publication Military Medicine.

In the research study, a yoga intervention was provided to combat military veterans (mostly Army Veterans) who struggle with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. The yoga intervention included a weekly 60 minute yoga session for 6 weeks. Data was collected both before and after the intervention, and the classes were vinyasa-style with a trauma-sensitive/military-culture informed approach, as described by the article:

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“Elements of trauma-sensitive yoga include no hands-on adjustment of participants’ postures during the classes, the avoidance of potentially vulnerable yoga positions such as “happy baby,” body sensing, using the English- language name vs. the Sanskrit name for each yoga pose, and giving participants the option of keeping their eyes open throughout the class. [This] protocol also includes modifications for participants with combat-related wounds, traumatic injuries, and other health conditions that may warrant adaptive yoga practices.”

Twenty-three veterans met the eligibility criteria for the study, 18 veterans completed five out of seven consecutive weeks of the yoga intervention, for a completion rate of 78.3%. The primary marker utilized was the PTSD Checklist (military version) score. Participants also completed the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale both prior to the intervention and after.

After completing the yoga intervention, researchers found a decrease in the PTSD symptoms of the participants, as well as decreased insomnia, depression, and anxiety symptoms, in addition to an increase in mindfulness. It is important to note that the intervention included techniques specifically for a military audience and trauma-sensitive audience. This shows that when appropriately performed, trauma-sensitive yoga is beneficial for improving the PTSD symptoms of combat military veterans.

Overall, presenting yoga as a means of coping with PTSD symptoms is a great option for veterans, and at the National Personal Training Institute there is a large percentage of students who are veterans enrolled in the Yoga Teacher Training Program. These veterans learn several techniques to aid in their own personal journeys as well as learning to teach & guide others who may be facing struggles of their own.

To read more about this study, please view the full article here:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/323016079_Military-Tailored_Yoga_for_Veterans_with_Post-traumatic_Stress_Disorder

Student Testimonial

“I have been taking Yoga through National Personal Training Institute since the end of July and it has truly been enlightening.

Our teacher, Megan is amazing! With over 25 years of experience, she has studied and trained in India and has taught Yoga in other countries. Megan isn’t your typical hottie in Yoga pants type of instructor that you see here in the United States trying to make a buck. Yoga is her life and she lives through the teachings. She conducts her classes with a great mix of grace and good humor and is very cooperative with all of her students.

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She has a very carefree and loving attitude and is always available to listen to her students to find out what they’re going through to better understand how to help fix them. She teaches us terms in Sanskrit as well as the simple terms (downward dog, child’s pose, etc…) to help challenge our minds and make us more knowledgeable as future instructors.

After retiring from the Navy after 23 years of service, 15 of them being attached to the Marine Corps, I completely destroyed my body. I have had back problems for over 20 years, two foot surgeries, hamstring surgery and a shoulder surgery in February that has really slowed me down. Yoga has been great therapy in helping me recover and in helping me learn to adjust to a new world outside the military.

Yoga works on the mind, body and soul and is teaching me patience through breathing.

In just seven weeks of class, I have strengthened my will power as well as my power of concentration. It is helping me to get rid of my anger, resentment, fear and self-doubt and focus more on self-realization.

Megan’s teachings also include the anatomy and physiology and teach you what muscles are affected through each posture to include how our fascia is connected throughout the body. She started the course by handing out a student guide on the first day, which we go through weekly and is super easy to follow along with. She had us teaching each other simple sequences by the end of the first week, which helped everyone erase any self-doubt about being an instructor and boosted everyone’s confidence right away!

Her motivation and positive attitude have carried over into my personal life and I find myself always referring back to: finding your breath, letting go, and living in this moment, as these are just a few of the things that she has instilled in the whole class.

I would recommend this course to anyone looking to become a Yoga Instructor or just wanting to find a better path in life. You will walk away very satisfied and a whole new person! And you’ll be an expert in drawing Yoga stick figures!”

-Todd P. Graduating January 2019

Yoga Quote

This profound quote by the influential grand master of yoga, Bellur Krishnamachar Sundararaja (BKS) Iyengar, is the perfect way to describe the power of yoga. His words show that it is not just a matter of perspective that yoga provides, but with consistent practice and dedication, the whole self is transformed. It truly is a wise and philosophical way to describe the impact of yoga.  His style of teaching is known as “Iyengar Yoga,” and is widely followed around the world. B.K.S. Iyengar lived until he was 95, and made this inspirational statement in an interview when he was 90:  “Even now, the maximum my body can do, I do. I am 90, and still I practice. I stay in Sirsasana (handstand) for half an hour, even without shaking. I'm improving still, progressing still. That is why I am still practicing with such energy. The mortal body has its limitations. Therefore, I will still practice 'til the last breath of my life so that I do not become a servant of the mind, but rather the master of the mind. Old age makes a strong man say goodbye. I am breaking the fear complex and living with confidence.”  We can take away so much from this, and B.K.S. Iyengar remains influential for his fearless teaching and constant openness to grow.    Read more of the interview here:  https://www.yogajournal.com/lifestyle/yj-interview-the-namesake

This profound quote by the influential grand master of yoga, Bellur Krishnamachar Sundararaja (BKS) Iyengar, is the perfect way to describe the power of yoga. His words show that it is not just a matter of perspective that yoga provides, but with consistent practice and dedication, the whole self is transformed. It truly is a wise and philosophical way to describe the impact of yoga.

His style of teaching is known as “Iyengar Yoga,” and is widely followed around the world. B.K.S. Iyengar lived until he was 95, and made this inspirational statement in an interview when he was 90:

“Even now, the maximum my body can do, I do. I am 90, and still I practice. I stay in Sirsasana (handstand) for half an hour, even without shaking. I'm improving still, progressing still. That is why I am still practicing with such energy. The mortal body has its limitations. Therefore, I will still practice 'til the last breath of my life so that I do not become a servant of the mind, but rather the master of the mind. Old age makes a strong man say goodbye. I am breaking the fear complex and living with confidence.”

We can take away so much from this, and B.K.S. Iyengar remains influential for his fearless teaching and constant openness to grow.

Read more of the interview here: https://www.yogajournal.com/lifestyle/yj-interview-the-namesake